Heberling Medicinal and Extract Company, Bloomington, ILL

The Heberling Medicine & Extract Company of Bloomington, IL manufactured medicines, spices, flavoring extracts, toilet articles, minerals, tea, perfumes and assorted miscellany ranging from stove polish to sewing machine oil. Founded in 1902 by brothers George C. Heberling and John G. Heberling.  According to Historian Bill Kemp, “George Heberling bought out his brother’s interest, and under his direction, the business grew to where it occupied the entire five-story brick building at Douglas and Prairie [streets in Bloomington, IL], as well as the three-story brick structure attached on the west. The business used self-employed salesmen who went door-to-door (or rather, farm-to-farm, since most of its customers were rural folk). At one time, more than 500 of these traveling salesmen sold Heberling wares in 28 states.”

Heberling bottle front.

Bottle embossed “HEBERLING”

Bottle embossed “BLOOMINGTON, ILL”

According to History of McLean County, Illinois, by Jacob Louis Hasbrouck, 1924, “George C. Heberling, president of the Heberling Medicine and Extract Company of Bloomington, is a well-known and successful businessman of McLean County. He was born at Cadiz, Ohio, March 12, 1875, and is a son of W. S. and Rose (Hagan) Heberling. George C. Heberling spent his boyhood at Cadiz, Ohio, and received his education in the public school. After completing a commercial and stenographic course at Valparaiso, Ind., he was employed in the office of the Griffin Wheel Company in Chicago for five years. In 1902, Mr. Heberling came to Bloomington and organized the Heberling Medicine & Extract Company, in which business he has been engaged ever since. This company manufactures medicines, flavoring extracts, toilet articles, etc., and is known in 25 different states. There are 300 people employed in the manufacture and sale of the company’s product. In 1900, Mr. Heberling was married to Miss Mertle Dickerson, a native of West Liberty, Iowa, and a daughter of John C. and Sarah A. Dickerson.  Mr. Heberling is a Republican and has served as president of the Bloomington Association of Commerce, and also president of the Bloomington Club. He is at present a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Commerce and has always taken an active part in the industrial development of the city in which he lives.”

Excerpt from History of McLean County, Illinois, by Jacob Louis Hasbrouck, 1924

Image from Illustrated Bloomington; Pictorially Showing Its Picturesque Scenes, Public Buildings, Churches, Parks, Wholesale And Retail Houses, Financial Institutions, Homes And Industries by Bloomington Illustrated Publishing Company; Hudson, J. H, 1917, Pg 94.  Building still stands at the South East corner of Douglas St and Prairie St in Bloomington, IL and is on the National Register of Historic Places. 

The tin reads Heberling’s Pure Ground Allspice 3 ounces net. Put up by G. C. Heberling Company proprietors of Heberling’s remedies, pure flavoring extracts and pure ground spices, soap, toilet articles, perfumes, etc. Bloomington, Illinois. The can was made by American Can Company

 

Photo post card of Heberling direct salesman with his horse cart, circa 1910s

Modern Kitchen Guide Book. The cover reads “A Modern Kitchen Guide”, “Distributed By G. C. Heberling Co., Bloomington, Illinois, Price 50c” and “The Quality Of Every Product Is Fully Guaranteed Bearing Heberling’s Trade Mark”. Circa 1940

Modern Kitchen Guide Book. The cover reads “A Modern Kitchen Guide”, “Distributed By G. C. Heberling Co., Bloomington, Illinois, Price 50c” and “The Quality Of Every Product Is Fully Guaranteed Bearing Heberling’s Trade Mark”. Circa 1940

Excerpt from Notices of Judgement Under the Federal Food, Drug, and and Cosmetic Act – Drugs and Devices. Issue 1, Part 2500, May 1940 – June 1949

Obituary from Pantagraph Newspaper Bloomington IL, March 3, 1952

Excerpt from The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, 24 Nov 1957

About Jessica

I am the supervisor of the analysis of the archaeological collection recovered from the Old Main excavation.
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