H.J. Heinz Company

While today the H. J. Heinz Company is synonymous with tomato ketchup, the company began with an entrepreneurial boy making and selling horseradish. By emphasizing product purity during a period when adulterated foods were commonplace, the company expanded as a manufacturer of thousands of varieties of prepared food products, many more than the mere 57 with which it is famously associated.

H.J. Heinz Company bottle

Bottom is embossed “H.J. Heinz Co. 111 Patd., 11-15-04″



According to the Heinz Bottle Codes, provided by the H. J. Heinz Company, “#111, held several varieties of Heinz vinegar, including malt and dill flavor. It was in use from 1905 to 1923.  The bottle design was patented on November 15, 1904, but wasn’t used until the following year.”

Excerpt from “American Profile, 1900-1909″ by Edward Wagenknecht, (1982) page 137-141

Heinz Glass Factory 1908. “As with the rest of its merchandise, H.J. Heinz Company was very particular about having the finest and cleanest glass bottles for its products. H.J. Heinz Company owned and operated its own glass factory in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, that produced the finest bottles, hand-blown from molds, in a variety of shapes and sizes. The H.J. Heinz glass works manufactured all of the glassware for Heinz between 1885 and 1910.” Image and description from the H.J. Heinz Company, Photographs, 1864-1991, Library & Archives, Senator John Heinz History Center.

Heinz Girls Filling Jars 1907. “H.J. Heinz Company “Girls” in the Bottling Department packing cucumbers, cauliflower, onions, olives, and peppers into decorative jars. The ingredients of each jar were arranged in an artistic design that reflected the individual tastes of each of the “girls.” Every jar was thoroughly washed before being filled. The jars were then delivered with the bottoms standing up so that no dust could get inside. As with the rest of its merchandise, Heinz was very particular about having the finest and cleanest glass bottles for its products.” Image and description from the H.J. Heinz Company, Photographs, 1864-1991, Library & Archives, Senator John Heinz History Center.

Labeling Machine 1901. “H.J. Heinz Company owned and operated its own glass factory in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, that produced the finest bottles, hand-blown from molds, in a variety of shapes. Designers created elegant signs and labels, such as the keystone shaped (from the keystone state) ketchup labels. Printed on lithographic stones, often with twenty colors, their sharp detail and deep jewel-like tones were a marvel.” Image and description from the H.J. Heinz Company, Photographs, 1864-1991, Library & Archives, Senator John Heinz History Center.

Wagon Load of Heinz Goods 1903. “Along with the high quality of its products, H.J. Heinz Company was known for the elegance of its delivery service. A horse-drawn delivery wagon (likely white with green trimmings) carrying boxes of Heinz goods, including baked beans in tomato sauce, queen olives, mustard dressing, and tomato chutney is pictured. The horses were pure black Percherons, bred originally as warhorses rather than draft horses. H.J. Heinz demanded that his horses maintained a certain conformity in weight, size, type, and color, and he housed them in his stables, dubbed “equine palaces,” which were a regular stop on public tours of the Heinz factory. Heinz had over 150 teams of Percherons operating out of its Allegheny City facilities.” Image and description from the H.J. Heinz Company, Photographs, 1864-1991, Library & Archives, Senator John Heinz History Center.

1902 ad for H. J. Heinz Company

1905 ad for H. J. Heinz Vinegar

1906 ad for H. J. Heinz 57 Pure Malt Vinegar

1918 ad for H. J. Heinz Pure Vinegar

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About Jessica

I am the supervisor of the analysis of the archaeological collection recovered from the Old Main excavation.
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2 Responses to H.J. Heinz Company

  1. annazeide says:

    These are great! Thanks for sharing. Do you happen to have a citation for the 1902 ad featuring “The Old Way” and “The New Way”? Or for any of the other advertisements?

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